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Arizona Cardinals divisional win: Answers for The Washington Post

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January 16, 2016; Glendale, AZ, USA; Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jeff Janis (83) catches a touchdown pass against Arizona Cardinals cornerback Patrick Peterson (21) and free safety Rashad Johnson (26) during the second half in a NFC Divisional round playoff game at University of Phoenix Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports
January 16, 2016; Glendale, AZ, USA; Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jeff Janis (83) catches a touchdown pass against Arizona Cardinals cornerback Patrick Peterson (21) and free safety Rashad Johnson (26) during the second half in a NFC Divisional round playoff game at University of Phoenix Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports /

15. How high should I take David Johnson in fantasy football next season?

You should have had him this season.  He made an immediate impact.  After the first couple of weeks his production trailed off until later in the season but that was expected given his rookie status and the players in front of him on the depth chart.

He is likely to share time with Chris Johnson but he is so versatile if you don’t put him on your draft list, why are you playing fantasy football?  He will score often in 2016.

16. Did Janis catch that ball?

Is this a question?  Did the game go to overtime?  He caught it.  As much as it pained me, he caught it.  Rashad Johnson punched that ball out about 20 seconds after the catch, so no debate unfortunately.

17. What exactly is a catch in the NFL?

Enough out of you Mike McCarthy.  Go back to Green Bay and start preparing for the 2016 season.

18. Shouldn’t both teams get the ball in overtime?

No.  Oh and no.  And in case you wanted to know again, no!  Listen the rules are the rules.  We ALL know them.  Can the overtime rules be improved?  Sure.  However, we all know that if you lose the coin toss, your team still has a shot at getting the ball.  Play defense.

It is really no simpler than that.  Play defense. I argued for what seemed like hours Saturday night and Sunday morning with people about this topic.

The answer is not to go to the college rules.  I don’t feel like six overtimes and the game score being 68-66.  Starting with the ball at the 25 and having untimed periods is not the answer.

The way it stands now, if you lose the toss, you still have a chance to get the ball even if you give up a field goal on that first possession.  The other team can score and you still get the ball.  Just keep them out of the end zone.  Not only did the Packers not do that, they let the Cardinals score in three plays.  Three.  Play defense.

Let’s also not forget that the Packers lost the coin toss….twice!  The coin didn’t flip the first time, ended in the Cardinals favor and Aaron Rodgers pointed it out to referee Clete Blakeman.  In fairness, the coin was flipped again.  In fact, there is no NFL rule that said he had to do that.  I was fine with the re-flip.  It turned up in the Cardinals favor again.  Sorry Rodgers.  This time the discount double-check didn’t work.

The overtime rules used to be sudden death, forever.  Until a couple years ago, this was how it was done.  Then it improved to allow a team to give up a field goal and still get the ball.  It is amazing the overtime rules never bother anyone until it affects their team.